Broadmeadows

Hume Central Secondary College and the Hume Global Learning Village and Broadmeadows Central Activity Area

Hume Central Secondary College was formed in 2007 as a merger of three existing secondary schools – Hillcrest Secondary College, Broadmeadows Secondary College and Erinbank Secondary. The school currently has approximately 1100 students spread across three campuses: Dimboola Road (Yrs 7-9), Blair Street (Yrs 7-9) and Town Park (Yrs 10-12).

The school was formed as part of the Victorian education department’s Broadmeadows Schools Regeneration Project (BSRP) through which 17 local schools were merged to form 10, and seven new school campuses including the three constituting Hume Central Secondary College, were constructed. The BSRP emerged locally in 2004 and was formally constituted by the State Government in late 2006 to comprehensively address what had come to be considered systemic local education failure. It aimed to do so through a combination of institutional restructuring, ongoing leadership and staff professional development, curriculum and teaching reinvigoration, infrastructure investment, and community engagement. The last two elements were designed to work in tandem, with the opening-up of school buildings for community use and simultaneous pursuit by State Government schools of shared facility opportunities with local government and other local education providers.

The commitment of Hume Central Secondary College (through the BSRP) to increase the stock and expand the versatility of existing local civic infrastructure emerged concurrently with Hume City Council’s facilitation of the Hume Global Learning Village (HGLV) strategy.  The HGLV sought to engage local learning facility and service providers in a joined-up approach to community learning while also directly increasing the stock of local learning infrastructure through the construction of the Broadmeadows Global Learning Centre. Furthermore, these two complementary learning infrastructure developments have taken place in the context of Local and State Government commitments to the regeneration of the Broadmeadows urban centre in which they are situated – a process systematically pursued through the Broadmeadows Central Activity Area planning process initiated in 2009.

The Opportunity Spaces research will examine the design, development, use and governance of Hume Central Secondary College’s share-use facilities in the context of this broader local investment in learning infrastructure and government commitment to urban regeneration. This Broadmeadows site raises interesting questions about the role schools and broader learning infrastructure developed as shared-use facilities might play in processes of urban regeneration.

Details of the Broadmeadows Schools Regeneration Project (BSRP) can be found in the report The Journey So Far (2010) (PDF)

Details of the Hume Global Learning Village (HGLV) can be found at the site Hume Global Learning Village (Link).  The work of the HGLV network is guided by the Learning Together strategies which have been developed by Council and the HGLV in partnership with our community. The latest strategy is Learning Together 2030 – Shaping Lifelong Learning in Hume City to 2030 (PDF)

Details of the Broadmeadows Activities Area can be found in the report: Broadmeadows Activities Area – Broadmeadows Structure Plan (2012) (PDF)

The Community

Thumb broad1.fw

Broadmeadows is a suburb located 17 kilometres north of the Melbourne central business district. It is part of the Hume City Council municipal area which was formed in 1994 through the amalgamation and redistribution of land from a number of councils including the City of Broadmeadows. It is the Central Activities Area in the northern metropolitan area, serving established suburbs as well as the northern growth corridor that extends along the Hume Highway and through Epping. This regional catchment is expected to grow from 500,000 people to around 770,000 people over the next 20 years.

European settlement of the Broadmeadows district began in the 1840s, with the first township established in the 1850s and the first local government, the Broadmeadows District Road Board, formed in 1857 (Lemon, 1982, p.25). The district was initially divided into large pastoral holdings primarily used for sheep grazing, but agricultural output diversified through the introduction of dairying and market gardens during the 1850s gold rush as local farmers sought to satisfy the needs of those travelling to the gold fields (Hand et al., 2011, p.9). Although many of the district’s farms were subdivided for residential use during the 1880s Melbourne land boom, the land reverted back to agricultural use when the boom ended and the envisaged housing estates had not materialised (Lemon, 1982, p.108). In the 1920s another round of subdivisions took place, but purchasers were again generally speculators and little actual housing development occurred in the district until after the second world war (Lemon, 1982, pp.169-174).

It was a decision by the Housing Commission of Victoria in 1951, which had been established in the aftermath of the depression to clear the inner-city Melbourne slums and create housing of a reasonable standard for the poor, to acquire more than 2,000 hectares in and around Broadmeadows to build a “model town” that spurred post-war growth (Lemon, 1982, p.169, Loder & Bayly, 1976, p.2). This was to be the largest project ever undertaken by the Commission, with the State Housing Minister referring to it as “one of the most ambitious plans in the world” (Lemon, 1982, p.169). Over the following three decades the Housing Commission erected 8,000 houses and flats in the Broadmeadows municipality, while private housing investment also contributed to rapid and substantial population (Lemon, 1982, p.200). The population of the municipality grew from 14,000 in 1951 to 66,000 in 1961 and had reached 100,000 by 1971. Growth slowed in the 1970s, but by 1981, the population was almost 107,000 a seven fold increase over 1951 (Data is from ABS Victorian Yearbooks).

Broadmeadows’ post-war residential development was matched and underpinned by industrial development. In 1959 Ford opened a local manufacturing plant, generating substantial employment opportunities and leading the way for other industrial investment in the area (Lemon, 1982, p.193). Clothing manufacturer Yakka, steel workers Clyde Industries, packaged food company Nabisco, electronics manufacturer Ericsson, and tyre manufacturer BF Goodrich, all established factories in and around Broadmeadows (Lemon, 1982, p.193, p.200).

______________________

HAND, K., MATTHEW, G., DARYL, H. & SHAUN, L. 2011. Life around here : community, work and family life in three Australian communities. Melbourne, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

LEMON, A. 1982. Broadmeadows: A forgotten history, West Melbourne, City of Broadmeadows in conjunction with Hargreen Publishing Company.

LODER & BAYLY 1976. Broadmeadows town centre study. Hawthorn, Vic.: Loder & Bayly.

broadmeadows_data

Download a broader demographic profile here.

Research Themes

– Urban regeneration and school-community facility development (More Information)

jsf.fw

Report on the Broadmeadows Schools Regeneration Project

JSF_quote.fw

The BSRP and community engagement

HGLV

Hume Global Learning Network Plan

baa.fw

State and Local Government Structure Plan

Hume Central Secondary College - Town Campus

Hume Central Secondary College – Town Campus

bball lg

Broadmeadows Education and Health Precinct

kangan.fw

Kangan TAFE

Broadmeadows Town Park

Broadmeadows Town Park

Broadmeadows Youth Central facility adjoining Town Park

Broadmeadows Youth Central facility adjoining Town Park

Broadmeadows Basketball Stadium - $4m Redevelopment Completed 2009

Broadmeadows Basketball Stadium – $4m Redevelopment Completed 2009

Broadmeadows Redeveloped Basketball Stadium

Broadmeadows Redeveloped Basketball Stadium

Broadmeadows Leisure Centre - Currently being redeveloped

Broadmeadows Leisure Centre – Currently being redeveloped

Broadmeadows Leisure Centre Redevelopment

Broadmeadows Leisure Centre Redevelopment

Tanderrum Way connection between Hume Central Secondary College and Broadmeadows Leisure Centre

Tanderrum Way connection between Hume Central Secondary College and Broadmeadows Leisure Centre

glc_close

Hume Global Learning Centre and Library

Hume Global Learning Centre foyer space

Hume Global Learning Centre foyer space

Hume Global Learning Centre multipurpose rooms

Hume Global Learning Centre multipurpose rooms

Hume Global Learning Centre - Library

Hume Global Learning Centre – Library

humecouncil

Hume Council Offices